England managers rated – is Gareth Southgate doing as well as we think?


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The England manager’s job is often described as ‘the impossible job’ because of the immense weight of expectation and scrutiny.

Current boss Gareth Southgate is among a small band who have reached the semi-final stage of a major tournament.

They are well on their way to qualifying for Euro 2020 with four wins from four and games against the Czech Republic and Bulgaria on Friday and Monday respectively.

Gareth Southgate is the current England manager

Getty Images – Getty

Gareth Southgate is the current England manager

If, and when, England do reach Euro 2020 then the expectation is sure to be there.

But where does Southgate rank among the other permanent managers in terms of win rate.

Here at talkSPORT.com, we have taken a look at the win percentage of every manager, not including caretaker bosses.

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14. Kevin Keegan, 1999-2000 – 38.9% win rate (18 games)

Keegan did manage to qualify for Euro 2000 but was knocked out at the group stage.

He resigned in 2000 following a 2002 World Cup qualifier loss to Germany, which was the final England game to be played at the old Wembley.

Kevin Keegan is statistically England’s worst manager

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Kevin Keegan is statistically England’s worst manager

13. Graham Taylor, 1990-1993 – 47.4% (38 games)

Taylor’s record at major tournaments was dismal as England were knocked out of the group stage in Euro 1992 and failed to qualify for the 1994 World Cup.

Graham Taylor managed England from 1990 to 1993

Hulton Archive – Getty

Graham Taylor managed England from 1990 to 1993

12. Terry Venables, 1994-1996 – 47.8% (23 games)

It may be a surprise to some to see Venables so low on the list considering he reached the semi-final of Euro 1996.

He only lost one game in charge of England but drew 11 and won 11.

Terry Venables reached the semi-final of Euro 1996

Hulton Archive – Getty

Terry Venables reached the semi-final of Euro 1996

11. Don Revie, 1974-1977 – 48.3% (29 games)

The famed Leeds United manager who two league titles, the FA Cup and League Cup with the club but had far less success with the national team.

He failed to qualify for Euro 1976 and then sensationally quit in 1977 to take charge of UAE.

Don Revie could not replicate his success with Leeds for England

Hulton Archive – Getty

Don Revie could not replicate his success with Leeds for England

10. Bobby Robson, 1982-1990 – 49.5% (95 games)

Bobby Robson was the third longest serving England manager and had a mixed record at major tournaments.

He failed to qualify for Euro 1984 and was knocked out of the group stage at Euro 1988. He fared better at World Cups as England reached the quarter-final in 1986 and semi-final in 1990.

Bobby Robson was England’s third longest serving manager

Hulton Archive – Getty

Bobby Robson was England’s third longest serving manager

9. Steve McClaren, 2006-2007 – 50% (18 games)

It is remarkable McClaren is so high considering his failure to qualify for Euro 2008. He won nine of his 18 games during his brief, but disastrous, spell.

Steve McClaren had a disastrous spell as England boss

AFP – Getty

Steve McClaren had a disastrous spell as England boss

8. Walter Winterbottom, 1946-1962 – 56.1% (139 games)

The first England manager and longest serving on the list. Winterbottom led England to four World Cups and reached the quarter-final twice.

Walter Winterbottom was England’s first manager

Hulton Archive – Getty

Walter Winterbottom was England’s first manager

7. Gareth Southgate, 2016-present – 56.8% (37 games)

The current England manager reached the semi-final of the World Cup in Russia last year and the final four of the Nations League this summer.

Southgate has played a lot of competitive football against some tough opposition and will perhaps climb the list the more games he manages.

Southgate replaced Sam Allardyce as England manager

AFP or licensors

Southgate replaced Sam Allardyce as England manager

6. Roy Hodgson, 2012-2016 – 58.9% (56 games)

Hodgson had a good record in qualifying for tournaments but was not successful when it came to the competitions themselves.

He reached the quarter-final of Euro 2012 but failed to get out of the group stage at the 2014 World Cup. His final tournament was Euro 2016 when England were knocked out at the round of 16 stage.

Roy Hodgson is currently Crystal Palace manager

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Roy Hodgson is currently Crystal Palace manager

5. Sven-Goran Eriksson, 2001-2006 – 59.7% (67 games)

England’s first foreign manager who managed our ‘Golden Generation’ of players that included John Terry, Frank Lampard, Steven Gerrard and Wayne Rooney and consistently underperformed at major tournaments.

He managed England to the 2002 World Cup, Euro 2004 and 2006 World Cup and reached the quarter-final at each tournament.

Sven-Goran Erikkson took charge of England at three major tournaments

AFP – Getty

Sven-Goran Erikkson took charge of England at three major tournaments

4. Ron Greenwood, 1977-1982 – 60% (55 games)

Greenwood helped bring West Ham’s 1966 World Cup winning trio Bobby Moore, Geoff Hurst and Martin Peters through at the east London club while he was manager between 1961 and 1974.

He did not have much success at major tournaments as England failed to qualify for the 1978 World Cup, knocked out at the group stage at Euro 1980 and reached the round of 16 at the 1982 World Cup.

Greenwood did select the first black player to play for England in 1978 and said: “Yellow, purple or black – if they’re good enough, I’ll pick them.”

Ron Greenwood managed England for 55 games

Hulton Archive – Getty

Ron Greenwood managed England for 55 games

3. Glenn Hoddle, 1996-1999 – 60.7% (28 games)

Hoddle reached the quarter final of France ’98 in his only major tournament as England boss.

He was dismissed from the job in 1999 after his controversial comments about disabled people being punished for sins in a former life.

Glenn Hoddle was dismissed as England boss in 1999

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Glenn Hoddle was dismissed as England boss in 1999

2. Alf Ramsey, 1963-1974 – 61.1% (113 games)

Ramsey was the England manager when they won the World Cup in 1966 and was the second longest serving boss.

After initial success, he failed to lead the side to Euro 1972 and the 1974 World Cup.

Alf Ramsey won the World Cup with England in 1966

Hulton Archive – Getty

Alf Ramsey won the World Cup with England in 1966

1. Fabio Capello, 2008-2012 – 66.7% (42 games)

Despite four years as manager, he only led England to one major tournament when they reached the round of 16 at the 2010 World Cup.

He had a good record in qualification matches, which may have inflated his win rate, and left shortly before Euro 2012 after the decision to remove John Terry as captain.

Fabio Capello has the best win rate of any England manager

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Fabio Capello has the best win rate of any England manager

Bonus: Sam Allardyce, 2016 – 100% (1 game)

The permanent manager with the best win rate is technically Sam Allardyce but it seems unfair to put him in as he only took charge of one game.

He was in charge for just 67 days and left after being caught up in an undercover newspaper sting where he allegedly gave advice on how to get around FA rules on third party ownership.

Sam Allardyce took charge of England for just one game

Getty Images – Getty

Sam Allardyce took charge of England for just one game

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